It’s the weekend: have some Drinkee with Sofi Tukker and go tonto

Sofi Tukker are a New York-based musical duo who have an affinity with the Portuguese language. And it hasn’t prevented them from gaining international recognition – including a Grammy Award nomination this year for their song Drinkee, which has Portuguese lyrics and was also used to great effect on an advert for Apple watch.

Here is the song and to help you follow it, the lyrics.

Com Deus me deito (With God I lie down)
Com Deus me levanto (With God I get up)
Comigo eu calo  (With me I go silent)
Comigo eu canto  (I sing to myself)
Eu bato um papo  (I have a chat)
Eu bato no ponto  (I clock in*)
Eu tomo um drinque  (I have a drink)
Eu fico tonto  (I get dizzy)

The lyrics are taken from the poem Relógio by Chacal, (born 1951, real name Ricardo de Carvalho Duarte). Relógio means a watch, clock or timepiece and there is some very useful contemporary vocabulary in it.

calar (calar-se in the reflexive) means to go quiet or to silence. A most useful derivative from it is cala a boca, which means shut up!

papo is a colloquial word that is very much in vogue thanks to chat sites on the internet. bater um papo is to have a chat, and bate-papo is the noun form of chat (more prevalent in Brazilian Portuguese than that of Portugal). Ele é um bom papo means he is a good talker or a gasbag. Bater is to beat, strike or hit.

* Bater no ponto is hard to translate exactly. I’ve also come across bater o ponto or simply bater ponto, meaning to clock in, to go full circle. Some translation apps say to hit the spot.

Tonto is one of my favourite adjectives in Portuguese. It can mean dizzy, lightheaded (especially after a few drinques) silly or stupid.

Here is another song by Sofi Tukker using Portuguese lyrics from a Chacal poem, the lyrics to which can be found here.

 

 

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