Laugh at the mistakes of the natives

error-102075_640For anyone who is studying Portuguese or is reasonably familiar with the language, here is a terrific article to read from the Brazilian business magazine Exame, one of the many titles owned by leading Brazilian publisher Grupo Abril. The article lists, in alphabetical order, the 100 most common mistakes made in Portuguese by the corporate world. It gives the word, an example of incorrect and and correct usage, and then an explanation. The subject matter is a little different, I guess, to what you would normally find in Portuguese language text books. And for anyone learning Portuguese, it is gratifying to see that native speakers make their fair share of errors. It makes you feel superior, haha. My favourite is that apparently people in the business world don’t know whether champanhe (champagne) should be masculine (o, um) or feminine (a, uma). I mean, come on business people, really! How many bottles do you have to uncork, how many glasses do you have to quaff before you get it correct?

glasses-153959_640

I have “liked” Exame on Facebook and so get its postings on my Facebook reader, along with some other publications from Abril. Although it is quite a serious magazine in print, as is often the case, its posting on social media can be lighter and fluffier. It is quite fond of “list” journalism, the top 10 of this in the world, the top 15 of that, blah blah blah. Although I think list journalism is lazy journalism, or often very superficial, I do sometimes succumb to the temptation of reading the lists. But at least when I do that in Portuguese I feel like I am doing something intellectual. stress-111425_640So if you really want to know what the top 50 most stressful occupations of 2014 are in the United States, go here. (Can you believe, DJs are on the list!). And if you want to know the nine cardinal sins of time-wasting when you are supposed to be studying, then go here. But don’t get stressed out by all the time you waste by doing this, OK?

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