Happy Easter, have you got enough dough?

Hello, it’s Easter and all around the world a lot of baking and cooking has been done in preparation. Even Bernardo has been busy in the kitchen, dunking tea bags in hot water. Those cultures that celebrate Easter probably have their own peculiar ways of doing it. In the Portuguese-speaking countries you will probably be offered massa sovada (which translates as kneaded dough, massa being the word for dough). It is a sweetbread. Like many Portuguese cakes and pastries, it has heaps of sugar and lots of egg in it. Some flour too, I would guess. If you want to know more just Google massa sovada and some recipes will pop up. A good Portuguese cook that I know (que se chama Maria) adds a nice touch – she boils eggs in water and cochineal (which, as I have just discovered by looking up that word, comes from a scale insect!) to give the eggshells a pinkish hue and then she puts the egg in the dough to bake. Here is a picture of the breakfast I am about to consume. I didn’t have a lens big enough to fit in my lunch🙂

Who needs sliced bread when you can eat a whole loaf? Bon appetit. Photo and styling: Bernardo (Note, the words styling and Bernardo rarely go together).

Who needs sliced bread when you can eat two whole loaves. Pass the high-fat butter, please. Bon appetit! Photo and styling: Bernardo (Note, the words styling and Bernardo rarely go together). All the hard work cooking: Maria De Sousa

Happy Easter in French is joyueses Pâques (for some reason it’s plural), in Portuguese it is feliz Páscoa, in Spanish feliz Pascua, in Italian buona Pasqua and in Romanian it’s Paște fericit.

The respective words for Easter egg are: oeuf de Pâques (F), ovo de páscoa (P), huevo de Pascua (S), uovo di Pasqua (I) and ouă de Paște.

Thus wik I um en Orklind lurneng u niw lingweg: Nu Zilend lnglesh. Tha Keewees huff u cumplatly dufforont vuwal systim. Huppy Istar!

3 thoughts on “Happy Easter, have you got enough dough?

    • Hello, how was your Easter? Yes the massa sovada is good, better than the commercial brioche that we can buy in the shops. She makes at least a dozen loaves as Easter approaches and gives them out to friends and neighbours. Aren’t we lucky? I am sure people appreciate your efforts too. I remember your great breakfasts! Cheers

Let's get a conversation started. Write your bit here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s